Eecs 484 final exam

This course teaches the security mindset and introduces the principles and practices of computer security as applied to software, host systems, and networks. It covers the foundations of building, using, and managing secure systems. Topics include standard cryptographic functions and protocols, threats and defenses for real-world systems, incident response, and computer forensics.

See the schedule for details. Warning To defend a system you need to be able to think like an attacker, and that includes understanding techniques that can be used to compromise security.

EECS 485: Web Systems

Under some circumstances, even probing for weaknesses may result in severe penalties, up to and including expulsion, civil fines, and jail time. Our policy in EECS is that you must respect the privacy and property rights of others at all times, or else you will fail the course. Acting lawfully and ethically is your responsibility. If in doubt, we can refer you to an attorney. As members of the university, you are required to abide by these policies.

If you believe you need an accommodation for a disability, please let an instructor know at the earliest opportunity.

eecs 484 final exam

Some aspects of courses may be modified to facilitate your participation and progress. As soon as you make an instructor aware of your needs, they can work with the Services for Students with Disabilities SSD office to help determine appropriate academic accommodations.

Information you provide will be treated as private and confidential. The University of Michigan is committed to advancing the mental health and well-being of its students. A variety of issues—such as strained relationships, anxiety, alcohol or drug problems, and depression—can directly impact student academic performance.

If you or someone you know is feeling overwhelmed, depressed, or otherwise in need of support, services are available. Introduction to Computer Security Winter This course teaches the security mindset and introduces the principles and practices of computer security as applied to software, host systems, and networks.

Professors J.

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Alex Halderman. Roya Ensafi. Daniel Genkin. Lecture slides and videos will be posted on the day of each class. No textbook is required, but if you would like additional references, we recommend:.

Section Mon. See calendar below.

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Lab sections will introduce tools and techniques that are important for completing the projects. We'll use Piazza for announcements, discussion, and questions about assignments and other course material.

eecs 484 final exam

Assignments will be collected via GitHub and returned via Canvas. For administrative issues, email eecsstaff umich. No textbook is required, but if you would like additional references, we recommend: Security Engineering by Ross Anderson Cryptography Engineering by Ferguson, Schneier, and Kohno. Five projects Projects 1—4 completed individually; Project 5 with a partner.EECS Thriving in a Digital World Prerequisite: none.

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From mobile apps to bitmaps, this course explores computational technologies and how they impact society and our everyday lives. Topics include: social networks, creative computing, algorithms, security and digital privacy.

Traditional computer programming is not a primary focus.

Computer Science 188

Instead, mobile applications will be created using a novel visual programming environment. Credit for college-level introductory programming coursework based on a satisfactory score on an approved exam e. Indicates preparedness to proceed to EECS Elementary Programming Concepts Prerequisite: none.

Flow of control: selection, iteration, subprograms. Data structures: strings, arrays, records, lists, tables. Good program design, structure and style are emphasized. Testing and debugging. Lecture, seminar, or laboratory. Apply electrical engineering concepts in circuits, computing, control, sensors, optics, power, signal processing, and wireless communications to a system such as a robot, and adapt the system to achieve competition objectives within defined engineering constraints.

Discrete Mathematics Prerequisite: MATH or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or Minimum grade of C required for enforced prerequisites. Topics covered include: propositional and predicate logic, set theory, function and relations, growth of functions and asymptotic notation, introduction to algorithms, elementary combinatorics and graph theory and discrete probability theory.

Time- and frequency-domain analysis of RLC circuits. Basic passive and active electronic filters. Laboratory experience with electrical signals and circuits. Theory and practice of signals and systems engineering in continuous and discrete time.

eecs 484 final exam

Continuous-time linear time-invariant systems, impulse response, convolution. Fourier series, Fourier transforms, spectrum, frequency response and filtering. Sampling leading to basic digital signal processing using the discrete-time Fourier and the discrete Fourier transform. Laplace transforms, transfer functions, poles and zeros, stability. Applications of Laplace transform theory to RLC circuit analysis. Introduction to communications, control and signal processing.

Vector calculus. Traveling waves and phasors.However, most other questions e. Thus, Piazza will be the fastest and the preferred method of getting your questions answered. For other questions regarding your specific personal circumstances i. This will ensure that one of the staff either the instructor or the GSIs will respond to your email in a timely manner.

All other emails sent to the instructor's personal email address may be ignored and not replied to. Considering the large number of students in this class, by respecting and following this communication guideline you will help us better serve your needs throughout the semester.

The book has a supporting websitewhere you can find answers to odd-numbered exercises. The book is really useful, especially for exams. We follow the book pretty closely. In addition, we recommend the following informal reference: Self-paced courses on introduction to Databases by Jennifer Widom, Stanford University.

There are several mini-courses at the above link and they are currently free. They are all very useful from a practical perspective and nicely complement the material that we cover in EECS EECS or graduate standing. You should have the background from a data structures course e. This course is designed to provide you with both an external and an internal view of relational DBMSs.

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Topics related to the external view will allow you to use a relational DBMS. Whereas course projects will involve a specific commercial database Oraclethe purpose of this course is not to learn the details of how to use any specific commercial database system, and we will minimize product-specific issues that you need to learn. If you are interested in the detailed operation of a specific commercial database system, you will be able to pick this up after you have taken this course.

Topics related to the internal view have been selected to give you an understanding of the fundamental database concepts and implementation techniques that are used in relational database engines. Using the course project, you will actually build a few key components of a database engine.

This course will allow you to better understand how a relational DBMS works, making you a more sophisticated database user. You will need the understanding provided by this course if you expect to be a decent database administrator, even if you have no plans to write code inside a database engine. We will use CTools for several purposes in this course.Please check your my. FAQ Link containing compilation of answers to most common questions related to the course material starting March Zoom link for 'virtual office hours' on Wednesdays - Mar 18, 25 and Apr 1.

You should have received an email with more specific instructions about the format of the final exam. Due date: Wednesday, March Any questions related to the lab should be sent to the TAs. TA emails are provided in the news header! Midterm exam will be held on Wednesday, Feb 26, at the beginning of lecture. The exam will be closed book and closed notes, and will cover all the material discussed in class up to and including the lecture of Feb The use of a simple calculator is allowed.

For your exact lab slot and location check your course registration information. Required Reading. M, Jan 6.

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Data Breaches and Credit Card Fraud. W, Jan 8. Introduction - Basic Concepts. Stallings, Ch. M, Jan Introduction - CIA. W, Jan Introduction - Categories of Security Threats. Introduction - Malware.

Course Summary

Steganography - part 1. Steganography - part 2 Cryptography - part 1. Lab 1. M, Feb 3. Cryptography - part 2.

W, Feb 5. Cryptography - part 3. M, Feb Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools. Second Edition. Aho, Lam, Sethi, and Ullman.

ISBN: Programming Language Pragmatics. Third Edition. Michael L. Compilers Construction EECS will aquaint you with the fundamental ideas surrounding the design and implementation of a compiler.

The course will stress a significant, practical course project: an end-to-end optimizing compiler. You will produce a program that accepts as input source code in a high-level language and produces as output low-level assembly representing an executable program.

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Courses

You will master fundamental concepts of lexical analysis, parsing, code generation, optimization, as well as calling conventions, dataflow analysis, grammars, variable bindings, control flow, types, and object memory layout. Students will gain experience with programming via the Cool programming language. You should at least be familiar with imperative programming in Python. This course consists of 6 Programming Assignments. Taken together, the assignments form a complete optimizing compiler for Cool, the Classroom Object-Oriented Language.

The project components are assigned in roughly increasing order of size and difficulty; proportionately more time is allotted for the later assignments.

Later assignments will be weighted more heavily in the final grade. Your program submissions will be evaluated for correctness, organization, and documentation. Assignments may be done individually or in teams of two, three, or four members. However, the first assignment must be completed individually to acquaint you with the Cool Language.

Students on teams are expected to participate equally in the effort and to be thoroughly familiar with all aspects of the joint work. All members bear full responsibilitiy for the completion of assignments.

Members turn in one solution for each Assignment; each member receives the same grade for the assignment. While you are allowed to change teams between assignments, teams may not be dissolved in the middle of an assignment without instructor permission. Assignments are due at pm on the date in the course schedule.

Assignments will be turned in electronically via a special submission server. Additionally, you will construct your compiler using one or more if you choose of the following languages. Final grades will be computed based upon the class average. The average grade will roughly correspond to a B. Homework assignments are due at pm on the due date. Assignments submitted late will be penalized based on lateness. Homework and exam regrade requests must be received by the GSI within one week of receiving your grade.

We will regrade for correcetnessmeaning that your grade may increase or decreaseso you could end up with fewer points than before the regrade.

eecs 484 final exam

All course materials are due by the end of the final exam date: April 24, at 6pm. There will be no changes after this time. Please abide by the following policies with regard to programming assignments.The examination time will be determined from the start time of the first lecture, recitation or seminar period of a full week. For courses having both lecture and recitation, the examination will be determined from the start time of the first lecture period.

Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted. For courses not included in either the regular exam schedule or the special exam periods, the examination date and time will be determined by the mutual agreement of the instructor and the students in the course. If any student is assigned four examinations during the same day, the University Final Examination Committee will seek reassignment if so requested by the student two weeks prior to the beginning of the Final Examination Period.

All exams will be held in the regularly assigned room unless otherwise indicated by the instructor. If such a conflict occurs, please contact the instructor or the department administering the Special Examination to request an alternate date or time. Some courses have pre-scheduled conflict exam dates but these are not elective. Students must receive permission from the instructor or the department in order to take an alternate exam and can request the conflict date and time only if a conflict occurs.

For questions regarding the final examination schedule, please contact the Office of the Registrar.

E-mail finalexams umich. Site by Michigan Creative. Winter Final Examination Schedule. Winter Final Examination Schedule April 25, 26, 29 and 30, May 1 and 2, The examination time will be determined from the start time of the first lecture, recitation or seminar period of a full week.

Lecture Time Exam Date Exam Time am Friday, April 26 am - pm or am Monday, April 29 am - pm or am Thursday, April 25 pm - pm or am Tuesday, April 30 pm - pm or am Thursday, May 2 am - pm or pm Thursday, May 2 pm - pm or pm Friday, April 26 pm - pm or pm Tuesday, April 30 pm - pm or pm Thursday, April 25 pm - pm or pm Wednesday, May 1 am - am.This course is designed to provide you with both an external and an internal view of relational DBMSs.

Topics related to the external view will allow you to use a relational DBMS. Whereas course projects will involve a specific commercial database Oraclethe purpose of this course is not to learn the details of how to use any specific commercial database system, and we will minimize product-specific issues that you need to learn.

If you are interested in the details of SQL programming, or the operation of a specific commercial database system, you will be able to pick this up after you have taken this course. Topics related to the internal view have been selected to give you an understanding of the fundamental database concepts and implementation techniques that are used in relational database engines. Using the course project, you will actually build a few key components of a database engine.

This course will allow you to better understand how a relational DBMS works, making you a more sophisticated database user. You will need the understanding provided by this course if you expect to be a decent database administrator, even if you have no plans to write code inside a database engine. EECS or graduate standing. You should have the background from a data structures course e. Instructor: Atul Prakash, aprakash [AT] umich. If it appears most student questions are code-related, office hours may be moved to CSE These two rooms are across the hall from each other -- check both places if you aren't sure where office hours are.

The times for office hours are available in the Course Calendar link in Ctools. That way, we can better optimize the utilization of our time. You can always cancel by dropping another email with the same title. We may come for a shorter time for office hours or skip them if you have not notified us and no one is there. The schedule for lecture and discussion sections is posted in the Course Calendar. The book has a supporting websitewhere you can find answers to odd-numbered exercises.

The book is really useful, especially for exams. We follow the book pretty closely.

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In addition, we recommend the following informal reference: Self-paced courses on introduction to Databases by Jennifer Widom, Stanford University. There are several mini-courses at the above link and they are currently free. They are all very useful from a practical perspective and nicely complement the material that we cover in EECS We will use CTools for several purposes in this course. Please try logging in during the first few days of class, and send e-mail to the GSI if you encounter difficulty.

Register at the site, if you have not used piazza before, using your umich. We will assume that everyone has signed up. Assignment Distribution: Each of the programming assignments and projects utilizes some source code provided by the instructor. We will be distributing this source code to you. Assignment Submission: Finally, you will submit your assignments via CTools. To submit your assignment, please log into CTools and click on the "Assignment" tab. Follow the posted instructions carefully as any deviation from these instructions could cause your submission to fail our auto-grading scripts.

The programming assignments requires you to use Postgres or an Oracle accounts.

FINALS WEEK @ BERKELEY

We will provide instructions on obtaining the accounts in the discussions. Exam 1: Oct.


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